For Lechlade, think simple. Go to your Fly Box and muster out the big four:

Black Quill Buzzers.
Bloodworms.
Damsels.
Black and green nymphs (Gold Headed Devil, Montana and Nomad)

The most effective way to fish these first two is to suspend one to three buzzers with an indicator and leave them static. This method will enable you to find the fish at the right depth. If the indicator does not appeal to you, you can simply let the flies drift in the wind and retrieve them very slowly.

The next two flies are very effective fished with a sink tip or a floating line with a long leader. Adding weight to the fly can provide a promising effect. Using a long leader, 15-20ft, you can cover the depths and find the fish. A slow figure of eight retrieve is best, however, vary your retrieve as some fish may like the chase.

t is indeed the perfect water for a natural selection so put away your “Christmas Trees” and use flies for the rise. Try the first of our big four flies:

Buzzers (Black Quill, Bloodworm)
Sedges (Sedgehog)

Like Lechlade these flies work particularly well. Fished “suspended” the Buzzer is a deadly weapon. If you’re feeling barve use two or three Buzzers on the same line fished under an indicator. Let the flies simply sit in the water and drift with the wind. The sedge can be used as the sight indicator (Kiwi style) or used as a dry fly.

If the dry fly is ineffective on an evening rise strip the sedgehog across the surface and see the rewards!

Damsel (Maribou tail)
Montana (Black and Green)…”Other colours work too”

If the thought of fishing traditional flies fills you with trepidation these two flies will do the deed. Best fished on a long leader, 15-20ft, with a floating line and a slow yet “sparky” retrieve. A deadly duo for those colder cloudy days.